ACM RecSys CrowdRec 2015 Workshop

Crowdsourcing and Human Computation for Recommender Systems

ACM RecSys CrowdRec 2015 Workshop

Crowdsourcing and Human Computation for Recommender Systems

Carrots for Couch Potatoes: Improving Recommendations by Motivating the Crowd

Fabian Abel, XING

Some recommender systems exploit quite complex features and give users the impression that black magic is performed to provide somewhat meaningful recommendations. Users may moreover adopt a rather passive attitude: instead of actively interacting with the recommendations and providing feedback they take the quality of the recommendations for granted. In this talk, we discuss challenges of crowd-based recommender systems and present some strategies for involving people more actively into the flow of computing recommendations. 

Fabian Abel is a Data Science team lead at XING. He enjoys working on large-scale data mining problems and delivering data products that do something meaningful. Before he joined XING in 2012, he was working as a postdoc at TU Delft, the Netherlands, and as PhD student at L3S Research Center in Hanover, Germany, researching user behavior and personalized information retrieval on the Social Web.


Changing Mobility Behavior through Recommendations

Martin Kracheel, SnT - Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust
University of Luxembourg


We describe a road traffic behaviour and mobility case study that was implemented in June 2015 in the congested city of Luxembourg. We explain the development and deployment of the Gamified mobile application CCC that offers users recommendations and incentives to undertake after work activities. With CCC we try to persuade users to change their commuting time so as to avoid the evening peak. The preliminary data indicates that behaviour change is possible and that traffic reduction can happen on a bigger scale.

Martin Kracheel is at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SNT) in Luxembourg, where he is currently pursuing his PhD. He is a member of the I-GEAR (Incentives and Gaming Environments for Automobile Routing) project and is conducting contextual mobility studies, leading to the development of gamified mobility games to change traffic participant behaviour. Prior to his work at SNT, Martin carried out research in multimodal interaction and participatory learning.